The Backfire Effect

The Oatmeal Cartoon By Matt Ingram On The Backfire Effect 600x1087px Mq.Jpg
An excerpt from Matthew Inman published May 3, 2017 of The Oatmeal on the backfire effect (full cartoon) inspired by author and podcaster David McRaney’s three-part podcast series on The Backfire Effect.

The Backfire Effect

It’s getting harder to find factual information these days. But even when you do get the facts, you’re far from out of the woods. If the new facts challenge your deepest convictions, your brain can double-down on your existing beliefs and reject the facts. It’s a psychological phenomenon known as the backfire effect.

When we come across things on social media and the web these days, we’re all on high alert for propaganda, manipulation, “fake news,” and outright lies. It’s easy to fall into a blanket rejection of alternative viewpoints. And that’s a failure. We owe it to ourselves to deal with reality, even when it’s inconvenient and makes us uncomfortable.

If you’re interested in learning more about the backfire effect, listen to the podcast series linked below from David McRaney, of the You Are Not So Smart podcast.

Here’s more on the backfire effect from David McRaney.

The Misconception: When your beliefs are challenged with facts, you alter your opinions and incorporate the new information into your thinking.

The Truth: When your deepest convictions are challenged by contradictory evidence, your beliefs get stronger.

Matthew Inman recently published one of his trademark Oatmeal cartoons on the backfire effect. As I was laughing my way through Matthew’s cartoon I was thinking about the aforementioned You Are Not So Smart (YANSS) blog, book, and podcast series, from David McRaney. McRaney’s work is where I first learned about the backfire effect. After finishing the cartoon, I noticed that Matt credited David’s work as inspiration for his cartoon.

Matthew’s cartoon on the backfire effect is up to his normal high standards and well worth the three minutes it will take you to scroll through it while you lie to yourself about when you’re going to finish your next project.

McRaney’s reporting on the backfire effect (along with his other work on bias and fallacies) is approachable and provides insight into the latest understanding and research on psychology and neuroscience. His journalistic roots ensure that his citations and the experts he interviews are first-class.

McRaney recorded a three-part series on The Backfire Effect that built on his excellent article on the topic. The podcast series is a great listen.

  1. Podcast 093 – The Backfire Effect – Part One
  2. Podcast 094 – The Backfire Effect – Part Two
  3. Podcast 095 – The Backfire Effect – Part Three

If you want to get right to the point about how you can best compensate for the backfire effect listen to his third episode, How to fight back against the backfire effect.

And good luck, we’re all going to need luck, more fact checking, and a healthy dose of self-awareness if we’re going to make it through the next few years.

~ julian